Tag Archives: Republicans

ANYTHING, as long as Obama fails

If America fails too.  So what?  GOP goal is to make sure Obama fails!

In a 57-41 vote, Senate Republicans successfully killed a “tax-extenders bill” that includes tax cuts, aid to states, an extension of unemployment relief, and a delay in a cut to Medicare payments to doctors. Republicans, joined by Democrat Ben Nelson and Independent Joe Lieberman, complained that the spending is not offset with other spending cuts or tax hikes; Democrats, in order to satisfy them, offset all the spending except for the unemployment relief, but it still wasn’t enough.

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Filed under Economics, hate groups, Playing Politics, Radical Rightwing groups, Republicans, The Economy, Wingnuts!

All Evangelicals Are Not Alike

This article from Mother Jones suggests there is a difference of opinion  between Evangelicals when it comes to giving illegal immigrants a pathway to citizenship.  And to think there is a man from Jerry Falwell’s Liberty University that is joining this group.  This could become very interesting.  How will this play in the structure of the GOP?  Will these opposing Evangelicals bring more moderates back to the GOP or will the Radical Evangelicals still  flex their muscle and keep their control?

Indypendent

http://herjones.com/politics/2010/05/right-wing-clash-over-immigration-reform

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Filed under Democratic Party, Diversity, Illegal immigration, Playing Politics, Political Reform, Radical Rightwing groups, Republicans

The Outer Limits……. and Bears…….

cartoonbears.jpg beers image by bluepineowl_photos

“For the next hour, sit quietly and we will control all that you see and hear. We repeat: there is nothing wrong with your television set. You are about to participate in a great adventure. You are about to experience the awe and mystery which reaches from the inner mind to… The Outer Limits.”

“The Outer Limits” was a respected, but short-lived, science fiction television program from the early Sixties.  Most episodes featured a “bear,” a monster of some sort, that provided the focal point for the show.

Our current political/social landscape has it’s own elements of “the Outer Limits.” Both sides, Right and Left, create their own “bears” to drive their ideological agendas. For the GOP, Tea Baggers and Libertarians the “bear” is the Federal Government. For Democrats and progressives, the “bear” is largely Corporations and Christian-driven social agendas.

Granted, the previous statement is a gross over-simplification, but the point is made.  There are elements on all sides that push the limits by demonizing the institution or ideology that fuels their ire.

Currently, their is a war within the Republican Party that threatens to purge even slightly moderate members and to be seen even in the least bit willing to work with Democrats is a virtual death warrant.

To their credit, Democrats are much less ideologically driven, but we have our own “lunatic fringe” that can’t support any semblance of compromise. To be sure, some issues, Gay Rights for example, have no room for compromise, but not all issues are quite so clearly defined.

“Politics is a process by which groups of people make  collective decisions.”

The above is the definition of politics from Wiki.

Well, do you see room for compromise on some issues, if so, what are they? Do you have your own personal “bear” or “bears” and what are they?


William Stephenson Clark

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Filed under Democratic Party, libertarians, Populists, Tea Party Movement, Uncategorized

How much does the Tea Party influence who wins?

I have a message, a message from the Tea Party,” said Rand Paul, a political candidate who made headlines across the United States this week. “We have come to take our government back.”

The Tea Party isn’t really a “party,” in the conventional sense.  They describe themselves as a loose movement of activists who draw their inspiration from the Boston Tea Party — an 18th-century anti-taxation uprising that helped spark the American War of Independence.

Today’s Tea Party wants lower taxes and less government spending, policies it says the Republican Party has promised but not delivered.  So now the Tea Party is supporting candidates who are officially running for office as Republicans, in hope they can change the party from the inside. This week Paul became the most prominent yet to win a Republican nomination, running for the U.S. Senate and sharing credit for his win with the Tea Party.

Paul wasn’t the only anti-establishment candidate to do well this week. Americans nationwide are angry at their elected leaders and several states had a chance to choose both Republican and Democratic nominees for elected office. There were setbacks for well-known candidates in both parties.

It was an anti-incumbency vote across the nation,” said Bill Richardson, a Democratic Party governor. “If you ran against Washington, you did well.”

With President Obama in the White House and his supporters in control of Congress, the Democrats are currently America’s governing party. The Tea Party is unhappy with the government so the conflict with the Democrats is clear.

But Republicans aren’t entirely sure where they stand. Some have embraced the newcomers, while others have politely pushed them away. The party’s leaders refused to support Paul, at least in part because he doesn’t really support them.

Can the Tea Party take hold among Republicans?  Will their chosen candidates win against Republicans and Democrats?  Will the winners come from among candidates who run against Washington with or without support from the Tea Party?  Are the extremes making most of the noise but the moderates will make the most difference?

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Filed under Elections, Political Reform, Tea Party Movement

New Newt or GOP’s Waterloo?

Jim DeMint Rise Upends GOP Order

WASHINGTON — Jim DeMint is becoming something of a tea party hero, even a potential conservative kingmaker, a status that is not making the freshman senator many friends among fellow Republicans in Congress.

A backbencher known for his eagerness to challenge the Republican establishment, DeMint is becoming one of the most influential voices of the conservative rebellion that’s shaking up GOP primaries. Tapping an anti-incumbent fervor, the South Carolina lawmaker is a coveted – and feared – endorsement, funneling money and grass-roots energy to long-shot candidates who threaten Washington’s GOP favorites.

His efforts, highly unusual for a freshman, have upset senators on Capitol Hill, where he’s viewed by many as an ideologue willing to purge centrist veterans.

“I feel a sense of urgency that some of my colleagues don’t,” he said in an interview. “The Republican Party, at least a segment of it within Washington, has increasingly joined the big-government, big-spending, earmarking ranks.” Continue reading

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Filed under Elections, Playing Politics, Political Reform, Radical Rightwing groups, Republicans, Tea Party Movement

What the GOP Costs America

The Party of NO is like an expensive frat party!

There may be “no shame in being the party of no,” according to Sarah Palin, but it sure is damned expensive, Vanity Fair says. In honor of Tax Day, the magazine set out to discover “Just how much money are taxpayers spending on the Republican Party’s commitment to doing exactly nothing.” The answer is evidently $1.32 billion, which includes $47.9 million for congressional salaries; $231.3 million for congressional aides; $163.1 million in health, retirement and other benefits; $533.1 million in paper clips, free postage, and other office expenses; $281.4 million in building maintenance; and $63.5 million in lost federal revenue due to tax-exempt donations to conservative think tanks. As for the latter, as Vanity Fair put it, “Sure, they’ve come up with some interesting ideas. When Republicans enact any of them, you can take this item off the list.”

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Filed under Republicans, Wingnuts!

McCain: ‘There Will Be No Cooperation’

Republicans appear ready to stand by the obstructionist strategy that failed to defeat health-care reform. “There will be no cooperation for the rest of the year,” McCain said on Monday. “They have poisoned the well in what they’ve done and how they’ve done it.” Senator Judd Gregg, meanwhile, said that the “the institution of Congress has been fundamentally harmed.” Gregg acknowledged, however, that health care could no longer be a winning issue for Republicans by November: “It’s very possible that people will not be as focused on this by next November.”

Read more at THE HILL.

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Filed under Healthcare, Republicans, Wingnuts!

States’ Rights on the Rise

According to The New York Times, whether it’s correctly called a movement, a backlash or political theater, state declarations of their rights — or in some cases denunciations of federal authority, amounting to the same thing — are on a roll.

Several states, most of them red, have been adopting resolutions emphasizing their own rights or denouncing federal authority. South Dakota and Wyoming have declared federal gun laws invalid if the gun is made and used within the state; the Oklahoma House has passed a resolution saying they should be able to vote on opting out of federal health-care reform; Utah’s legislature has said the federal government cannot enact health-care reform without its permission, and also said the state has the power to seize federal land under eminent domain; and Alabama, Tennessee, and Washington are all considering measures to assert local police’s power over federal authorities. Much of this legislation has been championed and pushed by Tea Parties, but it’s unlikely much of it will last. “Article 6 says that federal law is supreme and that if there’s a conflict, federal law prevails,” says one constitutional-law professor. “It’s pretty difficult to imagine a way in which a state could prevail on many of these.”

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Filed under hate groups, Playing Politics, Political Reform, Radical Rightwing groups, Republicans, Tea Party Movement

Reconciliation only for GOP

Thanks to the 2006 and 2008 elections, conservatives no longer control the American government. They do, however, continue to essentially control the American media. As a case in point, you’ve probably heard that part of the Obama administration’s plan to pass health reform is to use the budget reconciliation process. The reason you’ve probably heard is that the press has been obsessed with the topic, repeatedly labeling it a “controversial” move that would “ram” legislation via an end-run around the normal legislative process.”

In fact, though most bills do not go through the reconciliation process—typically because their subject matter makes them ineligible—the process has been invoked frequently since 1980. And the reason it’s remained obscure until 2010 is that until the health-care debate, the press never saw fit to go into conniptions over congressional procedure.

Some of the mainstream media coverage of the reconciliation issue has been bad. Some of it, like this excellent NPR story, has been good.

Continue reading here.

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Filed under Healthcare, Media

If the GOP had carte blanche to run the country

With Republicans positioned for major electoral gain in 2010, Newsweek is taking a look at how the party would govern if they were in power. The center of any Republican agenda would be tax cuts, tax cuts, and more tax cuts, but the article notes that anti-spending and anti-taxation fervor among the party’s faithful could make it near impossible to address the deficit without touching Social Security and Medicare, which are extremely popular. “Small-government Republicans come down squarely on the side of smaller deficits…Sounds great. Except that no one in either party has figured out how to do that in a way that won’t cause a rebellion among the voters,” the article reads. The article notes that there’s significant agreement between Obama and Republicans on both foreign policy, with the president presiding over an increase in troops in Afghanistan, and education, where the president’s support for charter schools and providing incentives for school reform on a state level has GOP roots.

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Filed under Republicans

Obama To Hold Health-Reform Summit

PUT IT ON TELEVISION!
Let anyone wishing to be obstinate do so in the light of day.

President Obama announced he will host a bipartisan health-reform summit with the country’s congressional leaders on February 25th. “I want to come back, after the Presidents’ Day congressional recess, and have a large meeting—Republicans and Democrats—to go through, systematically, all the best ideas that are out there, and move it forward,” Obama said.

Even I’m skeptical — me, the Pollyanna!  Does anyone think meaningful reform is possible?  I haven’t seen any hint that anyone in Washington actually knows what is needed to pass meaningful reform.

Republicans will need to have more than opposition.  Their choice:  show up and put their ideas on the table (snicker), or not show up at all.  I expect Republicans to jump at the chance for the nation to hear all their wonderful ideas and solutions to our problems and challenges.  We will have the opportunity to see whether they truly want to help Americans or they’d prefer to work hard toward helping America fail if that’s what it takes to defeat President Obama.

It will be interesting!  When Obama trounces the Republican arguments (which won’t be difficult), will they fall back on Acorn, or blame the homosexual lifestyle?

fnord

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Filed under Healthcare

Public Square 1-27-10

The State of the Union Address.  Time to reflect on what we have done and what needs to be done.  Will anyone be listening with an open mind or has partisan politics already spread its cancer on Obama’s presidency?

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Filed under Democratic Party, Playing Politics, President Barack Obama, Republicans

The Threat of Bioterrorism

Bioterrorism – the next phase of the War on Terror?  Where will the billions for this war come from?    We’ve been at risk for a long time but we are still too busy debating the merits of the wars we have already spent billions on (and currently spending) trying to kill all radical Muslims – and that has not done much good, has it?

Will Bioterrorism be the next political football that gets kicked down the road for someone else to promise to fix?

Lilac

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/01/26/us-unprepared-for-bioterr_n_436785.html

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Filed under Democratic Party, President Barack Obama, Republicans, terror, WAR

There’s that liberal media again – making things up!

http://www.cbsnews.com/blogs/2010/01/18/politics/politicalhotsheet/entry6113291.shtml

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Filed under Elections, Polls, Radical Rightwing groups, Republicans, Sarah Palin, Tea Party Movement

Obama may want to look at this….

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 18:26 EST –  Salon website
New poll shows Obama losing to unnamed challenger in 2012, but outlook may not be quite as bleak as it seems
By Emily Holleman
Depending on what side of the aisle you’re on, you may have woken up to some dispiriting – or validating – news this morning: A  National Journal poll in which 50 percent of respondents said they’d vote for “someone else” other than President Obama if the presidential election of 2012 were held today. Just 39 percent of those polled said they would “probably” or “definitely” vote to reelect the president.

The results broke fairly predictably along party lines with 86 percent of Republicans saying they would vote for someone else and 77 percent of Democrats reporting they’d vote to keep Obama in office. Among independents, the story’s a bit more troubling for Obama — just 33 percent in that group said they would vote to reelect him, while 54 percent said they’d opt for the alternative to-be-named.

Now, this clearly isn’t great news for the Obama camp, but the outcome isn’t nearly as damning as it appears at first glance.

The results may have been as dim as they are in large part because the question pitted Obama against an unnamed opponent from an unspecified party. Although pollsters often use this type of generic question, it tends to yield the worst imaginable outcome for incumbents, since respondents are free to picture the anonymous opponent any way they like.

“It’s going to tend to be a worst case scenario, because it allows you to imagine whoever you want,” Pollster.com’s Mark Blumenthal says. “If you’re an unhappy progressive, you may be imagining a primary challenger, even though you might be voting for a Democrat in a general election. If you’re a Republican, you may be thinking of your ideal candidate. It may be different if the Republican candidate is Sarah Palin or someone else you’re less happy with.” Continue reading

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Filed under Democratic Party, Elections, Obama, Polls, President Barack Obama, Republicans