Tag Archives: Music

“I’m in love with her and I feel fine!”

“I’m so glad, that she’s my little girl!

She’s so glad, she’s telling all the world.

That her baby buys her things, you know.

He buys her diamond rings, you know.

She said so!

I’m in love with her and I feel fine!”

The Beatles – “I feel fine” – 1964 – Lennon/McCartney

What could be better than cruisin’ down the road in the summertime, windows down and the wind blowin’ back your hair (if you have any left) and the radio cranked up to blast out one of your favorite tunes.

When you hear one of those songs that you instantly recognize from the opening riff and you just have to reach over and turn up the sound, you just know that a little part of your youth has come back to life.

For me, “I feel fine!” is a song that I know the moment that I hear John Lennon’s familiar feedback guitar. It is a signature riff – the first recorded use of feedback on a record. The song is credited to “Lennon/McCartney” but it was written by John. With Beatles songs, you can pretty much tell who wrote it by who sings lead vocals.

The Beatles are gone. John and George are dead, Ringo recently turned Seventy and Sir Paul buys “Just for Men” in 55 gallon drums. The music that they left us, however, will live on forever.

And so life goes on. As each day passes, we creep a moment closer to our date with fate. Life goes on, with you or without you. No matter how hard we mash our foot on the brake pedal of life, we cannot slow down or turn back time.

But we can turn up the radio for our  old favorite songs and blast out the tunes that helped define our lives.

When I am feeling down, nothing brings my mood back faster than listening to that good old rock ‘n’ roll music that I loved in days gone by. It truly doesn’t matter what it is – Stones, Beatles, Detroit rock music, the British Invasion or Motown – my blood flows again with renewed vigor and my foot starts tapping out the beat.

For each of us, there is that song, one that brings back memories of the “good old days” or that lost love.

What is yours?


William Stephenson Clark

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Filed under American Society, Music

When we used to listen to the radio.

“Hey hey mama said the way you move,
Gon’ make you sweat, gon’ make you groove. “

Led Zeppelin – “Black Dog” – Page/Plant/Jones – 1971

It was late spring of 1971 and I had just finished up my first year of college. My parents had sold my ’65 Pontiac Catalina coupe when I left, so now I needed a car. A friend of a friend had an old ’63 Volkswagen Beetle that wasn’t running. I handed over $150 in cash and paid the man to tow her home.

After a few days, I had her cleaned up and running pretty well. She was red with white interior and a sliding canvas sunroof. Most of my friends, probably twelve or fifteen in total, also had Vee-Dubs. We would all gather ’round when someone needed work done, pitching in to help.

We would all mount our tires “backwards” so they looked wider and we took off the narrow “running boards.” I painted my rims red to match the body color. Most of our cars had rusty bumpers, so we trimmed them off, too. I put a “hot rod” freeflow muffler on mine and it sounded all so cool.

We had an eclectic group of Vee-Dubs. They ranged from ’59 to ’70, a couple of convertibles, a Squareback and colors from grey primer to black to red to yellow. One guy filled all the body seams on his with Bondo and painted her green – with spray cans.

Down at the corner, there was a huge old oak tree in front of the bank parking lot. That’s where we would all hang out after work. By then, most of the guys had shoulder length hair and the girls wore skin-tight hip-hugger bell bottoms. Someone always had a bottle of Southern Comfort and inevitably there would be a few “cigarettes” passed around.

And then we would go crusin’. Sometimes it was to one of the local Metro Parks for swimming and other activities. Sometimes it was just down to the pool hall. If we had the cash, it would be off to the Grande or East Town for a concert.

Regardless of where we went, it was always in a line – ten, twelve, fifteen – Vee-Dubs in a row, windows down, hair streaming and the radios on, all tuned to WRIF-FM and blasting out the latest rock ‘n’ roll. We were a rolling, stoned band of gypsies and WRIF played the soundtrack of our youth.

What was the soundtrack of your youth?


William Stephenson Clark

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Filed under Just Plain Fun, Music

“She is all that I have left and music is her name.”

The thread title is from “the Southern Cross,” by Crosby, Stills and Nash, written by Stephen Stills. Personally, it is my favorite CS & N song. The full verse:

“So I’m sailing for tomorrow, my dreams are a dyin’.
And my love is an anchor tied to you, tied with a silver chain.
I have my ship and all her flags are a flyin’
She is all that I have left and music is her name.”

God blessed me with an enormous appreciation for music and then cursed me with absolutely zero musical talent. Zip! Nada! Zilch!

(I love the thread photo – old geezers, like me, still kickin’ it!)

One of the things I will miss most about Steven is interacting with him and others about musical favorites. Our friend had some unusual (perhaps) tastes in music. He loved the obscure, little known and unusual, along with the better known artists. He and I shared a mutual love of all things Dylan. My love of Bob Dylan went a little further – I named my son after him.

In keeping with my intent to stay non-political for a few threads, in remembering Steven, this post is all about music, one of the things most dear to our friend.

So, share your thoughts – music is the thread – what’s playing in your head?

William Stephenson Clark

62 Comments

Filed under Music, Uncategorized

I Believe In Father Christmas

They said there’ll be snow at christmas
They said there’ll be peace on earth
But instead it just kept on raining
A veil of tears for the virgin’s birth
I remember one christmas morning
A winters light and a distant choir
And the peal of a bell and that christmas tree smell
And their eyes full of tinsel and fire

They sold me a dream of christmas
They sold me a silent night
And they told me a fairy story
’till I believed in the israelite
And I believed in father christmas
And I looked at the sky with excited eyes
’till I woke with a yawn in the first light of dawn
And I saw him and through his disguise

I wish you a hopeful christmas
I wish you a brave new year
All anguish pain and sadness
Leave your heart and let your road be clear
They said there’ll be snow at christmas
They said there’ll be peace on earth
Hallelujah noel be it heaven or hell
The christmas you get you deserve

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Filed under Music

Playing For Change: Peace Through Music

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Filed under Diversity, Music

Guitar Player Elitists

george-harrison-album[1]Wednesday is guitar lesson day at my my house.  My teen daughter plays bass guitar and my teenage son plays regular guitar.  This afternoon, after school, we will make our weekly trek to the local music store for their lessons.

I was telling my daughter on the way to school this a.m. that George Harrison was considered to be not be that great of a guitarist among guitar players.  After having said that, I thought how really silly of a statement that was, since he will always be a much better guitar player than anyone I will ever personally know.

Peace be with you, George, where ever you are, across the universe . . .

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Filed under Music

Friday, 06/12/09, Public Square

guitar

Friday — doesn’t the weekend start tonight for many?  May you have music, peace, harmony, good conversations with friends, and some fun for the upcoming weekend!

fnord

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Filed under The Public Square