Category Archives: Ethics

Assistance, Please

I’ve been mulling what follows over for 48 hours. Arriving at no easy answer/resolution, I turn to my fellow PPPers for any thoughts, suggestions, recommendations or other input you might offer.

As many know, I reside in a townhouse situated within an apartment complex. Given the length of time here, my walks, and general interaction from sitting on the front stoop, I meet many residents. Some, I know by name. Most, I recognize. As the property manager (newly hired, relatively) said last week, most know who I am.

One of the latter is a young man I’ll refer to as W (he’s a writer). W and his spouse (“S” hereinafter) reside in a townhouse in the building to my South.I’ve not met S.

Thursday evening W knocked on my door looking to bum a cigarette. No problem there. As we were standing outside, I asked W how things were as it was apparent he wanted to talk. He responded with a not very good. He then told me that in early November, the little boy (about one year old) that I had met earlier this Fall had died suddenly. My head reeling, I made the appropriate noises and told him about my wife’s death four years ago. As we talked, it became clear that even though the boy was not W’s child (biologically), W had been very attached to him. W then mentioned he was in counseling with an appropriate individual whose name I recognized. We continued to talk, with me listening and offering such bits of learning I had to offer. During this time (about an hour), W’s cell phone rang multiple times, irking W. He finally answered, and after that conversation, he and I continued. W was quite agitated.

W acknowledged he was working through his grief, having moved recently to the anger stage. W then went on to tell me S refused to get any help, preferring to habituate various bars nightly for the purported purpose of becoming and remaining numb. Further, S had locked W’s car and taken the keys (which is why W was out of smokes). The rationale was to prevent W from potentially harming himself. I think otherwise, but whatever. Then, S calls again, and got most disturbed by the fact W was not home, but rather out talking with a neighbor. S kept getting louder and louder, finally terminating the call. W said S doesn’t like their next-door neighbor, who has been trying to help. The feeling is mutual; I’m acquainted with the neighbor (who has an adorable 15 month old daughter).

The next day, W and S’s neighbor came by. She related that there had been a terrible argument after S had returned from the bar (“shit-faced”, she called it), and S had threatened her earlier that day. After she clarified that W hadn’t been talking to her, S went ballistic and wanted to know with whom W had been talking. She didn’t know, but had a feeling it was I involved. So she could stay truthful, I neither confirmed nor denied. Her parting comment was that anyone who had been talking to W needed to be on their toes.

The question(s): If W comes back, I intend to do my best to help in any way I can. Should I refuse to so do? If S shows up shit-faced and threatening, 911 gets called by me. No further discussion on that. However, if S comes by and just wants to talk (without W) about the boy’s death, should I listen or suggest S find another outlet? If I was still practicing, the answer would be easier.

Any advice, etc., offered will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

N.B. Full disclosure: W’s mother (single) has seen me during my excursions and has bugged W about who I am. I’ve told W the bare details, and he wishes to introduce the two of us. If his mother is the woman with whom I had a conversation two months ago utside W’s front door, I’m interested.

9 Comments

Filed under Ethics, family, Life Lessons

787 Dreamliner teaches Boeing costly lesson on outsourcing

The airliner is billions of dollars over budget and about three years late. Much of the blame belongs to the company’s farming out work to suppliers around the nation and in foreign countries.

Continue reading

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Filed under Ethics, Wichita

When is it “time?”

In April, 2006, I stood in a sterile examining room, cradling Rocky’s head in my arms and telling him repeatedly that I loved him, as the vet administered a lethal injection that ended his life. Rocky was cancer-stricken. He had been given only three months to live, yet he managed to “fight the good fight” for nearly a year.

Some of you may have noticed that I always wear a dangling earring in my right ear lobe – that is my daily homage to my fallen friend.

I have another Golden Retriever now, Rufus, a wonderful dog that I rescued. I also care for my daughter’s Cocker Spaniel, Cookie.

Cookie has epilepsy. Last New Year’s weekend, she had five Grand Mal seizures in a twelve hour period. She came to live with me temporarily, since she was due to be put down. Miraculously, she stopped having frequent seizures and has been doing well, with few seizures, most of which were mild.

That is, until this past Monday. Cookie had two severe seizures, seven hours apart, and hasn’t fully recovered from the last one. She had been a happy, eight years old pup that loved to be around me and loved it when I said “who deserves a biscuit?!?!” Now she is listless and barely responds when I offer her a milkbone.

It is most likely “time.”

The question goes much deeper than a decision concerning a lovable Cocker Spaniel. What about Grandma and Grandpa? What about a spouse that is looking at the last days of a long life?

Although I knew it was right, it was difficult and  heartbreaking to decide to finally have Rocky put down.

How would I handle such a decision if it were thrust upon me regarding a child or a spouse? Choosing to end life-support has to be the most difficult decisions one will ever face.

There is a great debate raging in our society about “end of life” choices.

Where do you stand?


William Stephenson Clark

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Filed under Ethics

You Know What Else is Un-American, Rand Paul?

— from Kate Sheppard, Mother Jones contributer

Newly minted Republican Senate candidate Rand Paul apparently thinks that criticizing BP for the Gulf spill is “really un-American.” Because, you know, “sometimes accidents happen.”

You know what’s un-American? British Petroleum. You know what else is un-American? Operating your drilling rig in US waters under flag of the Marshall Islands so you can skirt Coast Guard oversight.

Here in Kansas we don’t have to worry about oil spills. At least untill Coffeyville KS floods again! ~ sekanblogger

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Filed under Crimes, Ethics, Humor, Republicans, Wingnuts!

What we’re losing without noticing.

Civility. Compromise. Discussion.

Remember them? Me too. I feel as if I’ve been a witness to their destruction at the hands of Stridency, Volume, and Exclusion.

Consider the news this week. A man with Parkinson’s disease, engaged in the simple act of letting his opinion in the face a of anti-health care reform protest – shouted at, mocked, humiliated. Was he hit or injured? No. Can you say you didn’t believe it was about to happen the first time you saw that video? Me neither. I feared for him and admire his bravery.

Where was the voice of reason in that crowd? I’d like to think I live in a nation where people are not afraid to protect those who need it, regardless of their political stripe. Yet none of the bystanders raised a hand to stop what was going on. “This is wrong, brother. I don’t agree with him either, but this is wrong.” That is all it would have taken. It didn’t happen.

This morning’s news is that Congressmen in favor of health care reform were spat upon and called hateful names that dredge up shameful portions of our nation’s history. What has become of us when men who are responding to the voices of their constituents can be humiliated for doing their job?

An important principle of our nation gives us all a voice. We’re all blessed by that principle. I’m not sure that principle doesn’t imply that we use that voice responsibly. Who in that crowd on Capitol Hill yesterday said “this is wrong brother. I don’t agree with them either, but this is wrong”?

On social media sites, opinions on health care are often met with strident opposing responses that come across as dismissive of opinions other than what the responder holds. Friends and families become estranged because the political atmosphere calls for not only rejection of opposing opinions, but shaming those who hold them.

My son will vote in his first election in November. After seeing the tone of arguments made on-line by admired friends and family, he has made the choice to speak only with his vote on political matters. I’m proud he’ll stay engaged in the process, but saddened that the tone of discussion these days is driving his voice, and probably others, into silence.

This is wrong, brother. We don’t agree, that’s our right,  but this atmosphere is wrong.

Omawarisan

22 Comments

Filed under Diplomacy, Ethics, hate groups, Life Lessons

PUBLIC SQUARE 01/25/10

The following comment was made in reference to a program that feeds poor children:

“My grandmother was not a highly educated woman, but she told me as a small child to quit feeding stray animals. You know why? Because they breed,” Bauer said, according to the Greenville News. “You’re facilitating the problem if you give an animal or a person ample food supply. They will reproduce, especially ones that don’t think too much further than that. And so what you’ve got to do is you’ve got to curtail that type of behavior. They don’t know any better.”

At a town hall meeting Thursday in northwestern South Carolina, Bauer noted his grandmother “told me as a small child to quit feeding stray animals. You know why? Because they breed.”

The Republican lt. governor did not specify if he included Social Security, Medicare, veterans benefits, car company and Wall Street bailouts in the category of government assistance that he disdains.

“The problem is, there are so many folks now who don’t have to do a thing. In government, we continue to reward bad behavior. Anytime we give somebody money, we’re rewarding them. We’re telling them to keep doing what they’re doing. Government’s got to change,” he said. “Babies having babies, somebody’s got to talk about. … Education can not really be improved until we address the real problem.”

To fix that, he said, “If you receive goods or services from the government, you owe something back.”

 

The real reason I bring this up, a Political commentator this morning made the statement that they have yet to figure out whether this will be good for his campaign or bad for it?

REALLY? You have to take the time to figure out if such a statement and comparison is good or bad for the campaign?

Maybe then there is no debate left to be had, this is one screwed up world!

TOSMARTTOBEGOP

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Filed under Ethics, The Public Square

Truthful or Agenda Driven?

Does Joan Walsh have a point about these unnamed sources?   Is this another book that is clearly one of those that people will see what they want to see and disregard those parts that don’t fit their personal agenda?

Lilac

http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/joan_walsh/index.html?

21 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews, Ethics, Media, Playing Politics