Monday, 7/1/13, Public Square

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8 Comments

by | July 1, 2013 · 6:00 am

8 responses to “Monday, 7/1/13, Public Square

  1. Our power was restored at 11:30 last night. We were good at flipping the switch to on when we entered dark rooms the past few days and when the power came back we had lights on in every room. 🙂 You know those rainbows behind every dark cloud are really there! That silver disc inside the electric meter that usually spins very fast at this time of year didn’t move at my house. It was an amazing sight to see that thing completely still for a few days.

    Second dye test was good! Grandson enjoyed both water and broth yesterday — first thing in his moth since last Wednesday. He might get to come home today. He still has a drain and they haven’t YET discontinued the IV but it’s closer now that they’ve determined all the pipes are hooked back together well. He’ll have some new things to learn about eating over the coming weeks, and it might go slow, but he will do it. Each new challenge will be met!

    • Why do I feel he will push it to the limit because it goes “slow”. Not that I have any experience in doing such a thing, you understand. 🙂

      • He already did. The doctor said he had to stay another night for observation and some “real” food to make sure he tolerated it. Grandson said bring it on. He had jello, then mashed potatoes. The original plan was clear liquid for at least a full week… 🙂 They are completing the check-out paperwork right now, should be home by dark.

      • As I suspected. Good for him.

  2. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/07/01/this-unsettling-chart-shows-were-not-growing-enough-food-to-feed-the-world/
    Stop population growth. Don’t mean to go all Malthusian on anyone, but this is a critical part of the solution.

  3. Bob White

    Today’s “post.” PERFECT ! This is what the contradiction in the US Empire is all about, today. Said it all in a simple cartoon.

  4. Governor Brownback’s sales tax hike goes is effective today, permanently raising Kansas’ sales tax rates from 5.7% to 6.15%. That will raise working Kansans taxes more than $1.1 billion over the next five years. And even with these higher taxes, the governor and Kansas republican legislators have made drastic cuts to education. To recap: working Kansans will pay more in taxes, pay more in tuition, and send their kids to underfunded, crowded schools. Welcome to Brownback’s Kansas.