Tuesday, 3/15/11, Public Square

11 Comments

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11 responses to “Tuesday, 3/15/11, Public Square

  1. wicked

    My first laugh of the day. I hope there are more to come. It sure beats the alternative.

    http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0311/51284.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

  2. wicked

    I want to know where my tax dollars are going. Local would be a good place to start, then county, then state, then federal.

    For instance:
    Some years ago, we voted to allow the lottery in Kansas. The money from this was to go to education. Has it?

    Last year most of us agreed to a 1 cent sales tax increase for one year, mainly to go toward education costs. Has it?

    • 6176746f6c6c65

      Sorry, wicked, I think you misrember.

      Originally, the State’s share of net lottery proceeds was to go 100% to economic development. This was changed some years ago to a percentage (40? 45?) going into the state general fund, with the balance to go towrds economic development. At no time was there any commitment to use lottery funds for education.

      While I argued then, and continue to argue today, that education was most important in economic development, nobody i power agreed.

  3. 6176746f6c6c65

    http://www.kslottery.com/WhereTheMoneyGoes/WhereTheMoneyGoes.htm

    Current info. I’ll try to find historical data.

  4. 6176746f6c6c65

    http://kansasstatutes.lesterama.org/Chapter_79/Article_48/

    Here are the current statutes. Notice the lack of “education” as a recipient.

  5. indypendent

    but wasn’t the lottery idea sold on the premise that education would benefit?

    Or maybe that is what other states are or have been doing?

  6. No. Yes.

    Edit (to amplify): From memory, the lottery was sold on the premise that economic development would bring more industries to Kansas, more jobs, generating more tax revenue, thereby allowing taxes (primarily income) to be reduced.

    Other states have used lottery revenues to benefit education, primarily higher education through creation of scholarships for residents. While it seems a good idea, it is fairly uniformly agreed that due to fluctuations in sales, etc., the amount of revenue to be generated by a lottery is too volatile to be used for funding of K-12 education.