2010 Elections are going to be interesting….

This article goes into key dates and key races to watch for the 2010 elections.  Will the pollsters be correct or will there be a surprise or two in the final count?

Lilac

http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2010/01/12/2010_political_calendar/index.html

8 Comments

Filed under Democratic Party, Elections, Polls, Republicans

8 responses to “2010 Elections are going to be interesting….

  1. It’s too far off for any information to be credible.

    Even here in Kansas it’s possible Brownback would decide not to run. I think that’s the only way we don’t see him as our state’s next governor, but, hey, it’s possible…

    I have been wondering if we could impact the race for the 4th district seat to the U.S. House. The Republicans (which I am one of 🙂 ) have five candidates running and only one of them can make it past the primary level. I plan to watch the polls carefully to see who is leading, who needs a boost, who might be the best candidate — from my perspective — to go on to the general election.

    I’m liking being a registered Republican in Kansas more each day. At the general election, registration doesn’t count since you vote for the person. So far I can’t see too many races with two or more qualified Democratic candidates that would require a vote at the primary level.

  2. According to The Votemaster

    Key Elections Are NOT for Congress

    While much attention has been focused on Congress, especially the Senate, probably the most important elections in November won’t be for Congress at all. There are four of them and they are for the governorships of the nation’s four most populous states: California, New York, Texas, and Florida. And the stakes are unusually high this year because the governors will get to approve or veto the redistricting plans from their state legislatures.

    If Jerry Brown (D) is elected governor of California, the Democrats who control both the state Senate and the Assembly will be able to gerrymander the state to their hearts’ content. Likewise, a victory by David Paterson (D) or Andrew Cuomo (D) in New York will make sure that the district the state is expected to lose is a Republican one. The Texas and Florida legislatures are controlled by Republicans and Republican wins for the governorship would give each of them free rein. Conversely, victories by Meg Whitman (R) in California, Rick Lazio (R) in New York, Bill White (D) in Texas, or Alex Sink (D) in Florida would stop their respective legislatures in their tracks and force a neutral redistricting.

    The new districts will be used for the elections 2012 through 2020. Probably as many as 20 seats in Congress for a decade depend on these four gubernatorial elections. That’s more important than one or two Senate seats in 2010.

  3. lillacluvr

    I think Brownback wants to be governor and then throw his hat into the ring for the big prize – the White House.

    I think he is just waiting for the right moment and if he has to quit in the middle of his term – what does he care?

    I wonder, if he runs for president while governor and loses his presidential bid, does that mean we ‘have’ to take him back as governor to finish his term?

    But who is rumored to be his running mate? Has anyone even heard yet?

    • If a running mate has been selected, I missed the announcement.

      I read some advice given by someone (can’t remember who or where) that Kansans should concentrate on the Attorney General race, given that Brownback will be governor. It would be much easier for Brownback to make Kansas a theocracy if he had the AG in his back pocket.

      • lillacluvr

        Oh no, I did not even think about that. Is that the cue for Phill Kline’s return?

      • Are Kansans that possessed? That driven by their need to control women’s reproductive health?

        Yes! Too many!

        Remember, we’re dealing with The Family and their goals.

        Don’t ever forget that “C” Street bunch! They are dangerous!

  4. lillacluvr

    I was just on the WE website and the comments about Roeder’s trial are very telling. For those who say they hate murder, they sure don’t seem to care about the murder of a doctor.

    • I’ll take your word for it — I trust you! And, it’s much better for my emotional and mental health to never go there again. 🙂

      I really appreciated what 6176 told us earlier this week about voluntary manslaughter often being a lesser charge at murder trials. He spelled out also that the evidence provided at trial will determine what charges are applicable.

      So, if what the news has told us is fact, the evidence should easily prove pre-meditated murder.

      Remember too that 6176 said the motion to exclude the voluntary manslaughter charge could be made again after the evidence is finished.

      I do hear what you’re saying about the attitudes of finding Roeder’s actions justified. Maybe someone will put a loaded gun to Roder’s head and kill him because they don’t like the legal job he performs. Isn’t that what they’re advocating?